Pasta

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Meatless Monday: Swiss Chard Ravioli in Smoked Onion Tomato Sauce, Part II

Published December 23, 2013 by jenmatteson

Over the weekend, I was asked to lead a cooking party, teaching a group of ladies how to make pasta, along with a few other things – but pasta was the main attraction.  As you may know, I posted this recipe a few weeks ago when I made it with Momma Marsha, and neither her nor Nate were huge fans.  They said it was fine, but something was missing.  Seeing as though I planned to make it for this cooking party, I had to perfect it.  Funny enough, all I did was add more cheese (mozzarella).  Also, I used whole milk ricotta, rather than low fat, hoping it would give more flavor (though I don’t think ricotta has much flavor to begin with, which was probably part of the problem during the first run through).  And it did, at least, that’s what Nate thought because he loved it the second time around.  Note to self: if something doesn’t taste just right, add more cheese. 

Swiss Chard Ravioli in Smoked Onion Tomato Sauce

The ladies seemed to be pleased as well, so I would say this re-make was a success!  I also changed the pasta dough recipe, as Chef Bush’s didn’t seem to work as well as the one I made with Momma Marsha.  Much easier to work with.

Swiss Chard Ravioli

Swiss Chard Ravioli in Smoked Onion Tomato Sauce

Source: Adapted from Chef David Bush/St. Francis Winery
Servings: 4-6

Ingredients:

For the smoked onion tomato sauce:
1 onion, peeled and sliced into 1/4 inch rounds
2 quarts tomatoes, diced
salt

For the pasta dough:
1 3/4 cup flour
2 eggs
1/4 tsp salt

For the pasta filling:
1 tbsp olive oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 bunch Swiss chard, chopped
1 egg, beaten
1/4 cup unseasoned breadcrumbs
salt
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1 cup ricotta
1 cup mozzarella, shredded

Directions:

1. Make the smoked onion tomato sauce.  Place onion slices in foil and lightly wrap.  Smoke in electric smoker on low for about 4 hours.  Preheat oven to 350.  Transfer onions from smoker to oven and cook until onions are soft, about 1 hour.  In a food processor, pulse onions until coarsely chopped.

2. In a medium saucepan, bring tomatoes to a simmer.  Add smoked onions and season with salt to taste.  Simmer for 15 minutes to incorporate the smoked flavor.  Place tomato mixture in food processor and pulse to make a slightly chunky sauce.

3. Make the pasta dough. Mix all ingredients in a food processor.  It’s important that the dough not come together, rather resemble coarse cornmeal.  Turn mixture out onto work surface and knead a few times.  Add a few drops of water if the dough seems too dry.  Wrap tightly in plastic and refrigerate at least 30 minutes, or overnight.

4. Make filling for ravioli. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium heat.  Add garlic, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.  Add Swiss chard and cook until tender, about 5 minutes.  Transfer chard to a mixing bowl and let cool.  Add egg, breadcrumbs, salt, nutmeg, ricotta and mozzarella.  Mix until all ingredients are incorporated.  Set aside.

5. Separate dough into 4 portions.  Using one portion, keeping the rest wrapped in plastic, knead and begin to roll out into sheets using a pasta roller.  Place scoops of 1 tbsp filling on pasta sheets, leaving at least 2-3 inches (depending on how large your ravioli cutter is) and cover with second sheet of pasta.  Press the dough firmly together around the filling, trying not to leave any air pockets.  Cut individual ravioli with round cookie cutter or ravioli stamper.  Repeat for remaining dough and filling.

6. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and add raviolis in batches, being sure not to crowd the pan.  Boil for 3-4 minutes, remove and toss with smoked onion tomato sauce.  Serve and garnish with parmesan cheese if desired.

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Meatless Monday: Swiss Chard and Ricotta Ravioli in Smoked Onion Tomato Sauce

Published November 25, 2013 by jenmatteson

Only 4 1/2 months after my 30th birthday, I am finally trying to wrap up my 30 before 30 list.  Disappointing that I couldn’t finish it up before my birthday, but, in case you didn’t know, I was slightly busy getting married this summer 😉

Swiss Chard and Ricotta Ravioli

Speaking of getting married, this recipe comes from Executive Chef David Bush at St. Francis Winery, where we had our dinner in Sonoma, CA after our ceremony.  This was by far the most fantastic meal I have ever had, maybe closely followed by the first food and wine pairing we’d done there in November of 2012. 

As you probably know, I’m not big on cheese, which may make you wonder why my first attempt at homemade pasta would be cheese filled ravioli.  Well, I’m cooking for a dinner party next month, and my client (sounds so official!) decided her and her guests would like to make homemade pasta, and we agreed on ravioli.  So, that being said, I was determined to make this amazing sounding recipe from Chef Bush in hopes it would be perfect for this dinner party.

Swiss Chard and Ricotta Ravioli

Making the pasta was actually a lot easier than I imagined.  Momma Marsha and I spent an afternoon trying to man her pasta roller (its the kind that should hook to a countertop, but she doesn’t have a place to do so, so we had to hold it, crank it, and feed the dough in all at the same time – this would have been impossible if it were just me).

I made a few raviolis sans cheese, so more or less just Swiss chard, but most were by the book so Momma Marsha, Leo (my FIL) and Nate could try them and give me their honest feedback.  Unfortunately, the feedback wasn’t what I was looking for.  However, I’m always glad to hear the truth, especially so it can be improved and better for the dinner party.  The ricotta fell flat, so for next time, I think I’m going to opt for a blend of cheeses.  The star of this recipe, however, was the smoked onion tomato sauce.  I absolutely loved it; it would be fantastic on spaghetti with sausage (lightbulb!).  If you don’t have a smoker, I think it’d be just as easy to roast the onions and add a touch of liquid smoke.  Never tried it, so don’t take my word for it.  But if you do try it out, let me know how it turns out.

All in all, this recipe is still a work in progress, but I wanted to be sure to share even my not-so-great recipes.  Though, again, the tomato sauce was killer!

Swiss Chard and Ricotta Ravioli with Smoked Onion Tomato Sauce

Swiss Chard and Ricotta Cheese Ravioli in Smoked Onion Tomato Sauce

Source: Adapted from Chef David Bush/St. Francis Winery
Servings: 4-6

Ingredients:

For the smoked onion tomato sauce:
1 onion, peeled and sliced into 1/4 inch rounds
1 quart tomatoes, diced
salt

For the pasta dough:
2 cups flour
1/4 cup olive oil
3 eggs
2 tsp salt

For the pasta filling:
1 tbsp olive oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 bunch Swiss chard, chopped
1 egg, beaten
1/4 cup unseasoned breadcrumbs
salt
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1 cup ricotta

Directions:

1. Make the smoked onion tomato sauce.  Place onion slices in foil and lightly wrap.  Smoke in electric smoker on low for about 4 hours.  Preheat oven to 350.  Transfer onions from smoker to oven and cook until onions are soft, about 1 hour.  In a food processor, pulse onions until coarsely chopped. 

2. In a medium saucepan, bring tomatoes to a simmer.  Add about 4 tbsp of chopped smoked onions and season with salt to taste.  Simmer for 15 minutes to incorporate the smoked flavor.  Save remaining onions for another use.  Place tomato mixture in food processor and pulse to make a slightly chunky sauce.

3. Make the pasta dough. Mix all ingredients in a food processor.  It’s important that the dough not come together, rather resemble course cornmeal.  Turn mixture out onto work surface and knead a few times.  Add a few drops of water if the dough seems too dry.  Wrap tightly in plastic and refrigerate at least 30 minutes, or overnight.

4. Make filling for ravioli. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium heat.  Add garlic, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.  Add Swiss chard and cook until tender, about 5 minutes.  Transfer chard to a mixing bowl and let cool.  Add egg, breadcrumbs, salt, nutmeg and ricotta.  Mix until all ingredients are incorporated.  Set aside.

5. Separate dough into 4 portions.  Using one portion, keeping the rest wrapped in plastic, knead and begin to roll out into sheets using a pasta roller.  Place scoops of 1 tbsp filling on pasta sheets, leaving at least 2-3 inches (depending on how large your ravioli cutter is) and cover with second sheet of pasta.  Press the dough firmly together around the filling, trying not to leave any air pockets.  Cut individual ravioli with round cookie cutter or ravioli stamper.  Repeat for remaining dough and filling.

6. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and add raviolis in batches, being sure not to crowd the pan.  Boil for 3-4 minutes, remove and toss with smoked onion tomato sauce.  Serve and garnish with parmesan cheese if desired. 

Crab Ravioli with Shallot Cream

Published September 19, 2013 by jenmatteson

How many daily emails do you get?  How many do you get that you just erase before even opening, either because you know what it is and you don’t want it, or because you don’t even care what it is?  I don’t remember when I signed up for daily emails from Food and Wine, but I started getting them a few weeks ago.  BIG MISTAKE.  Not because I’m not interested, and not because I don’t want to see what’s in it.  Just the opposite.  They send daily recipes, in which most sound absolutely amazing.

Crab Ravioli with Shallot Cream

This one was no different.  A few great things about this recipe.  One: Crab.  YUM.  Two: Ravioli, without the hassle of making homemade pasta (I will do this some day…soon hopefully).  Three: No cheese.  Okay, for some (pretty much all) of you, this might sound like a not-so-great-thing, but it was wonderful for me, and still tasted rich, creamy and decadent.

I loved this recipe, though Nate thought it was too rich.  While it is creamy, the crab paired with the tarragon and shallots gives a very fresh, bright flavor.  The recipe says it makes 8 servings, but I got 16 ravioli out of this recipe, so it’s more like 4.  Maybe my wonton wrappers were larger, or I just filled them twice as much.  My grocery store didn’t have clam broth, so I bought seafood stock instead.  I know it’s not the same, but figured it couldn’t be too different.  I also used half-and-half instead of heavy cream for both the filling and the sauce.  In the sauce, I added just a touch of arrowroot (cornstarch would work just as well) to thicken it a bit.  Everything was melded very well and I really loved this recipe.  I would make it for company, but only when Nate wasn’t there since he didn’t care for it as much.

Crab Ravioli with Shallot Cream

Crab Ravioli with Shallot Cream

Source: Adapted from Food and Wine
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

For crab filling:
1/2 tbsp unsalted butter
1/2 tbsp flour
1/4 cup half-and-half
1/2 lb lump crab meat, picked over
1 large scallion, only white part, minced
1 tsp fresh tarragon, minced
1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
salt and white pepper (black is fine if you don’t have white, white just looks better)
32 wonton wrappers

For shallot cream:
1 tbsp olive oil
1 shallot, minced
1 cup half-and-half
1 cup clam broth
1/2 tsp arrowroot or cornstarch
2 tsp Dijon mustard
1 tbsp flat leaf parsley, minced
salt and white pepper (again, black pepper would be fine here)

Directions:

1. Melt butter in medium sauce pan over medium heat.  Add flour and whisk until combined, about 30 seconds.  Add half-and-half and continue to whisk until very thick, about 1 minute.  Remove from heat and let cool.  Fold in crab meat, scallion, tarragon and mustard.  Season with salt and pepper.

2. On a work surface, lay out 4 wonton wrappers and lightly brush with water.  Scoop about 2 tbsp of crab filling into the middle of each, and top with another wonton wrapper.  Push out any air pockets and firmly press edges of wonton wrappers together.  Trim excess dough with a 2 1/2 inch biscuit cutter, round or fluted edge (I don’t have a biscuit cutter, so I trimmed the edges – unevenly – with a pizza cutter).  Transfer to baking sheet in single layer and repeat with remaining filling and wonton wrappers.

3. In a deep skillet, heat olive oil over low heat.  Add shallot and cook until softened but not browned, about 4 minutes.  Add half-and-half, clam broth and arrowroot or cornstarch, bring to a boil over high heat.  Once thickened slightly, remove from heat and whisk in mustard and parsley.  Season with salt and pepper.  Cover and set aside.

4. Cook ravioli in a large pot of boiling salted water.  Ravioli will float to top when they are done, about three minutes.  Remove with slotted spoon and add to shallot cream sauce.  Toss gently over low heat and serve immediately.  Garnish with more parsley or chopped chives.

Who ever heard of arrowroot? Pork Lo Mein

Published April 15, 2013 by jenmatteson

I swear…this will be the last Asian recipe for a while.  Even Nate and I are getting Asian’d-out.  But, I still had those rice stick noodles that I didn’t use up from the Pad Thai and Spicy Peanut Noodle Salad.  I honestly wasn’t even planning to post this meal, but it came together so quickly, and it was something new and different, I just couldn’t not share it with you.  I literally threw this entire recipe together on a whim, using only whatever I had in my kitchen.  It came together so nicely, I wish throwing dinner together when you have absolutely no idea what you are going to make was always this easy.

DSC02271DSC02272

It’s still not spring outside, so pasta and red wine was the perfect fit for sweatpants and wine night in the Pigzilla home (that’s always Thursday nights).  Another bonus was that I got to try out a new “spice” of mine.  I have tons of dried herbs and spices; several that have not even been opened.  This was courtesy of my awesome dad and is connections!  Arrowroot is one of those “spices”.  I use quotations as I didn’t really know what it was, so I assumed.  Turns out, it’s actually a clear thickener that is used in gravies, sauces and pie fillings that is more easily digested than other thickeners.  Who’da thunk?  Not me, but I definitely planned to try it out with my lo mein sauce!  I love learning new things about food!

2009 St. Francis Ole Vine Zinfandel

We don’t eat a lot of pork, but I got some chops on sale and stocked  our new chest freezer!  I used only one pork chop because I like a high veggie to meat ratio, but two would be good for those meat eaters!  This came together really quickly, which always rocks when making weeknight dinners.  The flavor was perfect, and I added just the right amount of Sriracha for our preferences, probably about 2 tbsp.  The sesame oil was the star of the show, which isn’t surprising as it packs a lot of flavor with just a teeny tiny bit.

Pork Lo Mein

Pork Lo Mein

Source: Pigzilla original
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1/3 cup low sodium soy sauce
1/2 cup water (or chicken broth – I didn’t have any open, so I went with water)
1 tsp sugar
2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
2 tbsp sesame oil, divided
1 pork chop, cut in 1 inch pieces
salt and pepper
2 carrots, julienne
1/2 red bell pepper, julienne
1/2 green bell pepper, julienne
1/2 yellow bell pepper, julienne
1 medium onion, halved and sliced thin
1/4 cup sake
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp arrowroot (or cornstarch)
Sriracha sauce
4 oz rice stick noodles, cooked

Directions:

1. In a medium bowl, combine soy sauce, water, sugar, vinegar and 1 tbsp sesame oil.  Set aside.

2. In a large skillet, heat remaining 1 tbsp of sesame oil over medium heat.  Season pork with salt and pepper.  Add to heated skillet and cook until no longer pink, about 5 minutes.  Remove from pan.

3. Increasing heat to medium-high, add peppers and onions to pan.  Saute until they begin to soften, about 2 minutes.  Add sake to pan and cook for 1 minute longer.  Remove vegetables, reserving remaining sake in pan.  Add garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.  Pour in sauce mixture and bring to a boil.  Slowly whisk in arrowroot or cornstarch.  Reduce heat to low and simmer until sauce reaches desired consistency.  Add Sriracha to desired taste.

4.  Once sauce has reached desired consistency and taste, add in noodles, pork and vegetables.  Toss to incorporate ingredients and distribute sauce evenly.

Spicy Peanut Noodle Salad

Published April 14, 2013 by jenmatteson

I mentioned a few posts ago that I was really on an Asian kick, and I wasn’t kidding. I’ve got another one. Only because I had 8 oz of fresh rice stick noodles leftover, and I wanted to use them up. I have no idea how long they would be good for, and the packaging was absolutely no help.

Spicy Peanut Noodle Salad

It’s “spring” here in Minnesota, so we must start thinking about our summer figures. Oh, and I have a small event coming up at the end of August that I’d like to look my best for 😉 I love eating salads; they are so versatile, and definitely a meal for spring and summer. While the technical start of spring was March 20th, we’ve had nothing close to what we would call “spring weather”. In fact, we just had a snow storm this week, dumping up to 9″ of snow in some areas. More snow is in the forecast for this weekend. I’m really glad I put all my patio furniture together and out on my deck when it was nice two weeks ago.

Two weeks agoThis week

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But let’s talk about the salad. I really loved this salad, and the noodles bring a lot of sustenance to it. As a carb lover, adding the carbs right into my salad is brilliant! The original recipe was for  a noodle salad, but I just added more lettuce and took out some noodles to make a more salad-salad :p  This still made a huge salad, enough for Nate and I to have dinner, and each take it for lunch for two days. We ran a little short on the dressing, but that’s no biggie, though in my opinion, it was the best part! I loved all the veggies in this salad, and I added in bean sprouts (as they were also leftover from the Pad Thai I made earlier in the week).  This was a great way to use up leftover veggies, noodles, and bean sprouts to create a new exciting entrée salad.  It came together super fast, too, which is always a huge plus!

Spicy Peanut Noodle Salad

Spicy Peanut Noodle Salad

Source: Adapted from Branny Boils Over
Servings: 6

Ingredients:

For the dressing:
5 tbsp low sodium soy sauce
2 tbsp water
3 tbsp peanut butter
2 tbsp sesame oil
1 tbsp rice wine vinegar
1 tsp fresh ginger, minced
3 cloves garlic
1 tsp sugar
1 Serrano chile, seeded
1/3 cup peanuts

For the salad:
1/2 red bell pepper, julienne
1/2 yellow bell pepper, julienne
2 carrots, shredded
1 head romaine lettuce, sliced into ribbons
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cooked and shredded
4 oz rice stick noodles, cooked and cooled
1 1/2 cup bean sprouts, thoroughly rinsed (I quickly sautéed mine)
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
crushed red pepper flakes

Directions:

1. Combine all dressing ingredients in a food process, except for the peanuts.  Puree until smooth.  Add peanuts and pulse until coarsely chopped.

2. In a large bowl, combine all salad ingredients.  Pour dressing over the top and toss to combine.  Garnish with cilantro and red pepper flakes before serving.

Shrimp Pad Thai

Published April 8, 2013 by jenmatteson

I’ve had quite the Asian theme going in the last few posts, and we couldn’t be happier campers.  Well, maybe Nate would be if he didn’t have to split the leftovers with me!

Shrimp Pad Thai

Pad Thai was on my 30 Before 30 list, and as the months are quickly dwindling away, I am finally getting to it.  I really should have tried it much sooner because it was amazballs.  Part of the reason it has taken me so long to try this recipe is because one of the star ingredients, tamarind, isn’t available at my local grocery store.  I actually had to step outside my comfort zone and stop into my local Asian market.  Not sure why I was hesitant or what I was really expecting, but the gentleman who was working was quite friendly and more than helpful.  This market carried paste, powder, and the solid block.  Some upscale grocery stores may carry tamarind, usually in paste form and in the Asian isle.  But, the recipe I followed strongly suggests using the solid form that comes in a block.

TamarindDSC02251

Clearly, I’ve never worked with tamarind before, but I’m sure I’ve had it in a handful of Asian dishes I’ve ordered, not even knowing what the flavor really was.  Tamarind is a pod-like fruit that tastes quite sweet and slightly tart.  In my opinion, the sweetness and consistency is similar to figs.  Seeing as though I only needed 3 tbsp for the Pad Thai, I had most of the block left.  After some research, it appears the tamarind block can be stored in airtight container on the shelf.  No refrigeration necessary.  Most people says it lasts “forever”, though I’m guessing you’ll use it all before forever comes after you’ve tried this Pad Thai.

Shrimp Pad Thai

This recipe comes from Nicole over at Prevention RD.  It was another home run!  I can always count on her food to be yummy.  There are a lot of components, and it’s slightly cumbersome to prepare, but as Nicole suggests, if you have everything measured out and ready to go, it comes together really quickly.  This dish really hit the spot!  After a long night with friends (and a few drinks), we were really ready for some flavorful comfort food.  It’s amazing how much flavor the peanuts add, so do NOT forget them!  For you vegetarians, the shrimp can easily be omitted or substituted with tofu, and omit the fish sauce or use this recipe for a substitute.  I only made a few adaptations to Nicole’s recipe, which was using 1 tsp cayenne rather than 3/4 tsp (of course we like it spicy), and using fresh rice noodles rather than the dried variety.  Whether you think you like Thai food or not, I highly suggest trying this out.  Nate and I really enjoyed it; he even had two hearty helpings!

Shrimp Pad Thai

Shrimp Pad Thai

Source: Adapted from Prevention RD
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

3 tbsp tamarind solid
3/4 cup water, boiling
3 tbsp fish sauce
1 tbsp seasoned rice vinegar
3 tbsp sugar
1 tsp cayenne pepper
4 tbsp peanut oil
8 oz rice stick noodles (my grocery store had fresh, but dried will work just fine)
2 large eggs
1/4 tsp salt
1 lb shrimp, peeled and deveined
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 medium shallot, minced
6 tbsp unsalted peanuts
3 cups bean sprouts
1/2 cup scallions, sliced thin
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
1 lime, cut into wedges

Directions:

1. Soak tamarind in 3/4 cup boiling water for 10 minutes.  Push tamarind through mesh strainer, reserving water in medium bowl.  To the bowl, add fish sauce, rice vinegar, sugar, cayenne and 2 tbsp peanut oil.  Stir and set aside.

2. If using dried rice stick noodles, cover with hot tap water in large bowl; soak until softened, pliable, and limp but not fully tender, about 20 minutes.  Drain noodles and set aside.  If using fresh rice stick noodles, in a medium sauce pan, fill with water and bring to a boil.

3. In a small bowl, beat eggs and 1/8 tsp salt.  Set aside.

4. Heat 1 tbsp oil in large skillet or wok over high heat until just beginning to smoke.  Add shrimp and sprinkle with remaining salt.  Cook and flip occasionally, until shrimp are opaque and beginning to brown around edges, about 3 minutes (don’t worry, they don’t have to be cooked completely through at this point).  Transfer to plate and set aside.

5. Discard any excess liquid in pan.  Add remaining tbsp oil to skillet and swirl to coat; heat to medium.  Add garlic and shallot and cook until golden brown, about 1 1/2 minutes.  Add eggs to skillet and stir with wooden spoon until lightly scrambled, less than 1 minute.  Meanwhile, drop rice stick noodles into boiling water, immediately remove and transfer to skillet.  Pour fish sauce mixture over noodles, increase heat to high, and toss constantly to coat noodles evenly.  Scatter 1/4 cup peanuts, bean sprouts, scallions (reserving some for garnish) and cooked shrimp over noodles.  Continue to cook on high, tossing until noodles are tender, about 3 minutes.

6. Transfer noodles to serving platter, sprinkle with remaining peanuts, scallions and cilantro.  Serve immediately with lime wedge.

Sausage and Pumpkin Pasta

Published October 2, 2012 by jenmatteson

I had an open can of pumpkin that I wanted to use up, but since my house was filled with desserts from the weekend, I didn’t want to make anything else sweet.  I decided to go with Nicole’s sausage and pumpkin pasta.  I know it sounds a little out there, and I thought so too, but I loved every other ingredient in this recipe, and I’m adventurous, so why not try it?

I wasn’t so confident about Nate though, so I didn’t disclose what we were having for dinner until he was actually eating it.  He saw the turkey sausages in the fridge thawing out, and asked if we were having brats for dinner.  I said, “no”.  Later, he again asked about the “brats” in the fridge.  I told him it was none of his business, though I could sense he was really getting excited for “brats”.  Finally, I had to break his little heart and tell him that the “brats” in the fridge were turkey sausages and were for dinner.  To his credit, turkey sausages do look a lot like brats.

The pasta was really great!  I was surprised, and actually expected it to be a little more pumpkiny, but the sausage really was the star of the show.  Perhaps this was because I like to buy the hot turkey sausages, but still, I thought the pumpkin would have been more prominent.  Nate and I both had a second small serving it was so tasty.  I think next time I would use just a little more sage, but beyond that, it was curiously delicious.

Sausage and Pumpkin Pasta

Source: Adapted from Prevention RD
Servings: 4

12 oz whole wheat pasta
1/2 lb italian turkey sausage
1 medium onion, chopped
8 oz mushrooms, sliced
4-6 cloves garlic
1/2 cup low sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup white wine
1 cup canned pumpkin
1 tsp rubbed sage
salt and pepper
1/4 cup parmesan cheese

Directions:

1. Cook pasta according to package directions.  Drain and set aside.

2. Spray a deep skillet with olive oil and heat over medium heat.  Add sausage and onion and cook until sausage is almost cooked through.  Add mushrooms and garlic.  Cook for another 2-3 minutes.  Drain juices if necessary.

3. Add chicken broth, wine, pumpkin, sage, salt and pepper.  Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 5-6 minutes.

4. Spoon mixture over pasta, garnish with parmesan cheese and serve.

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