Fish

All posts in the Fish category

Grilled Chili-Garlic Swordfish

Published December 21, 2013 by jenmatteson

I’ve had swordfish one time in my life, and from what I remember, I thought it was just okay.  It’s a fairly plain, meaty white fish, which makes it an excellent canvas for flavor.  This was added to my 30 Before 30 list by my husband, though I’m not really sure what prompted it.  As you can probably guess, swordfish isn’t all that easy to come by, but you can likely find it at your specialty grocer, such as Whole Foods, where this recipe actually comes from.

Grilled Chili-Garlic Swordfish

I was excited to try it, because you know I love anything spicy, and Sriracha is the best!  Lucky for me, I decided to make it on a day that was somewhat mild in late November for Minnesota.  We’ve had some bone chilling wind chills the last few weeks, but the few days after Thanksgiving has been a much needed heat wave.  It was about 30 degrees, but no wind.  This made great timing for a recipe I needed to grill!

Grilled Chili-Garlic Swordfish

I loved the flavor of the marinade and thought it would be perfect for such a lacking fish.  Nate loved the it, and demolished his within minutes.  I didn’t care for it as much; I thought it had an overly fishy flavor.  And I love fish – I’ve never met a fish I didn’t like, but this just didn’t taste good to me.  I think part of the problem was that I may have slightly overcooked it, which actually will bring out a fishy flavor in seafood.  Funny right, because you’d think it’d make the fishy flavor go away!  But, I promised to share all my adventures with you, good or bad.  In this case, I guess it was 50/50 since Nate liked it and I didn’t.  I’d love to try this marinade on anything else; I’m sure shrimp, salmon, chicken, even pork would be lovely. So if you don’t want to take the risk, or spend the money on swordfish, try the marinade on something you’ve already got in your fridge or freezer!

Grilled Chili-Garlic Swordfish

Grilled Chili-Garlic Swordfish

Source: Adapted from Whole Foods Market
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

2 1/2 tbsp. tamari
2 tbsp. olive oil
2 tsp. lemon juice
1 1/2 tsp. Sriracha or other chili-garlic paste
4-6 oz swordfish steaks

Directions:

1. Preheat grill to medium-high heat.  In a small bowl, whisk together tamari, olive oil, lemon juice and Sriracha.

2. Season steaks generously with salt and pepper, then brush with the tamari mixture.  Grill swordfish about 4-5 minutes, then flip, and cook for another 3-4 minutes until opaque in the center, brushing occasionally with remaining tamari mixture.

Advertisements

Hoisin Glazed Salmon Burgers

Published June 19, 2013 by jenmatteson

I used to not like fish.  I know, I can’t believe it either.  But, now if I could afford to, I would eat fish every day.  When I was young, I would dabble in a little fried fish every now and then, only because it was fresh and my dad caught it, and it was what’s for dinner.  Finally, I grew out of my picky stage and realized how delicious fish is, especially my dad’s cracker crusted pan-fried walleye.  But, we’re not here to talk about walleye, we’re talking about salmon.

Hoisin Glazed Salmon Burgers

One of my first times trying salmon was at a place in downtown Minneapolis near my work.  It was a fairly fancy seafood place, and I wanted to try to expand my horizons, so I ordered a salmon burger.  It was so delicious.  Granted, I did top it with tartar sauce, not knowing at the time it was weird – but it is.  To this day, if I’m there for lunch, I’m likely to get the salmon burger.  Too bad I don’t work in Minneapolis anymore.

Hoisin Glazed Salmon Burgers

So when I saw Nicole’s recipe for salmon burgers, it took me back to my nearly virgin fish days.  The flavors aren’t really similar, but I still wanted to try it because I love salmon, and I really like Asian flare, so the hoisin glazed salmon burgers sounded right up my alley.  These came together so super quickly, and even better, tasted amazing.  The pickled cucumbers on top really add a bang to the burger.  It might also have to do with me adding a little extra cayenne pepper to the pickling juices.  The burgers were firm enough that I might have been able to grill them, but I didn’t want to take the chance of them falling apart, so I used a cast iron skillet.  The sesame oil added the perfect amount of nuttiness and wasn’t too overpowering.  This is a great summer burger recipe and alternative to your average turkey or beef burger.

Hoisin Glazed Salmon Burger

Hoisin Glazed Salmon Burgers

Source: Adapted from Prevention RD
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

For the cucumbers:
1/3 cup water
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 tsp fresh grated ginger
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1/2 cucumber, sliced thin (about 16 slices)

For the burgers:
1/2 cup panko
4 tbsp chives, minced
2 tbsp cilantro, chopped
1 tsp low-sodium soy sauce
1 1/2 tsp fresh grated ginger
1 tsp lime zest
1-1 lb skinless wild, fresh salmon fillet, finely chopped
1 large egg white
1 1/2 tsp sesame oil
2 tbsp hoisin sauce
4 hamburger buns

Directions:

1. In a small saucepan, combine water, vinegar, garlic, ginger and cayenne.  Bring mixture to a boil.  Remove from heat and add cucumbers.  Let stand for 30 minutes.

2. In a large mixing bowl, gently toss together panko, chives, cilantro, soy sauce, ginger, lime zest, salmon and egg white.  Separate mixture into four equal parts and shape into patties.

3. In a cast iron pan, heat sesame oil over medium-high heat.  Add two patties to the pan and cook for 3-4 minutes, until beginning to brown on the bottom, and flip.  Cook for another 3 minutes, brush the tops with hoisin sauce and cook for 30 seconds more.

4. Place patties on bun and top with cucumbers and top half of bun.

Recipe Swap: Jalapeno Cilantro Pesto Crusted Tuna

Published June 7, 2013 by jenmatteson

This week’s edition of recipe swap, hosted by Sarah at Taste of Home Cooking, was Mexican.  I was assigned creamy citrus jalapeno cilantro pesto from Jey at The Jey of Cooking.  I love pesto and I WC-Recipe-Swap-badge-1love cilantro and jalapenos, so I was looking forward to making this.  The ingredients were somewhat similar to the cilantro pesto I recently made from Thug Kitchen, but with the addition of citrus, which was appealing.

Jalapeno Cilantro Pesto Crusted Tuna

I had to change a few things from Jey’s original recipe, but not much.  Her recipe calls for pistachios, which I love, but Nate is allergic.  So instead, I used almonds.  I also had to add additional cilantro because my pesto was very watery.  I used the juice of one orange and 1/2 grapefruit, but maybe my fruit was really big or extra juicy, because I couldn’t get the pesto to thicken up as pictured on Jey’s post.  I added almost no oil because it was already so runny.  I should have added the juice a little at a time, but now I know for next time.

Jalapeno Cilantro Pesto Crusted Tuna

Jey recommended serving this over chicken or tossing with pasta.  Seeing as though I’m really getting down to the wire for my 30 Before 30 list, I thought I’d take a risk and try it with tuna and check another item off.  All the flavors go really well together, so Citrus Jalapeno Cilantro Pestowhile it was a risk, it wasn’t by any means epic.  I marinated the tuna steaks in the pesto for about 30 minutes – I didn’t want to do it too long so as to start to cook the tuna with the acid in the pesto.  After quickly searing the tuna, I sliced and served it over a wasabi vinaigrette slaw and drizzled additional pesto over the tuna.  Not only was the tuna cooked to perfection (we like it rare, but feel free to cook it further if you like), but the pesto added the perfect amount of flavor, without over taking the clean taste of the tuna.  The crusted pesto added the perfect amount of crisp to the outside of the tuna, while the drizzled pesto added it a little more freshness. Nate and I both quickly cleaned our plates and adored this recipe!

Jalapeno Cilantro Pesto Crusted Tuna

Jalapeno Cilantro Pesto Crusted Tuna

Source: Cilantro Pesto slightly adapted from Jey of Cooking, Tuna is Pigzilla original
Servings: Pesto makes about 1 1/2 cups, 2 servings of tuna

Ingredients:

For the cilantro:
1 orange, juiced
1/2 grapefruit, juiced
1 cup walnuts
1 1/2 cup almonds
1 bunch cilantro
1 onion, roughly chopped
1 jalapeno, seeded
6 cloves garlic
salt and pepper
2 tbsp honey
1-3 tbsp olive oil

For the tuna:
2-8 oz sushi/sashimi grade tuna steaks
salt and pepper
olive oil

Directions:

1. To prepare the cilantro pesto, combine walnuts, almonds, cilantro, onion, jalapeno and garlic in a food processor.  Pulse a few times, until ingredients are well combined.  Add juices a little at a time – you might not need all of it – until pesto comes together and has thick consistency.  With processor on, drizzle in olive oil until pesto has reach desired consistency.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.

2. Season tuna steaks with salt and pepper then coat with pesto.  Refrigerate for up to 30 minutes.

3.  Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a cast iron skillet over high heat.  Reduce heat to medium-high and add tuna steaks.  For rare tuna, cook for about 3 minutes on one side.  Turn steak up on one end and cook for one minute more.  Turn once more, so first seared side is facing up.  Cook for 2 minutes.  Finally, turn once more, cooking the edge that has not yet been seared.  Remove from heat and let rest for at least to minutes.  Slice thinly and dress with additional jalapeno cilantro pesto.  (I served mine over a wasabi vinaigrette slaw and a little basmati rice).

Check out what the other ladies did for the Mexican Recipe Swap:

Cedar-Planked Salmon with Dill and Lemon

Published July 5, 2012 by jenmatteson

Nate and I both love fish, but we rarely eat it at home.  I’m such a compulsive frugal shopper, that sometimes it pains me to buy fish because it can be expensive compared to chicken or turkey.  But, sometimes it’s okay to splurge.  Today I splurged on salmon fillets, which I’ve been wanting to grill on our cedar planks for some time.

I thought I’d try something classic like dill and lemon so the flavor of the cedar could still shine through.  Since I’ve never made this before, I googled the ingredients, and the first result that came up was my favorite place to search for classic recipes, Food and Wine.  Perfect.  It had everything I wanted in addition to a salt cure, followed by a sake marinade.  The only down side of this recipe is how long you have to wait to eat it.  The salmon should sit in the cure for 1.5 hours, and then in the sake for another hour.  Add on another 25 minutes for cooking, plus 5 for resting…it’s far far too long.  This is certainly a great recipe for a weekend (or a day off work) so you can get it started early.  I didn’t get the cure going until about 6, and since we had to run some errands, I got the sake in there at about 8:30.  Then I waited the next hour in agony, praying for time to go by faster so we could eat.

But it was more than worth the wait!  The salmon literally melted in my mouth.  It was so silky smooth and bursting with fresh flavors of the dill and lemon.  I really wished I would have tried this while entertaining, but I suppose that gives me a good reason to make it again.  Who wants to come over for dinner??

Cedar-Planked Salmon with Dill and Lemon

Source: Food and Wine
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1/2 cup kosher salt
1/8 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup dill, chopped, plus 4 sprigs
zest of one lemon, plus 8 slices
4-8 oz salmon fillets, with skin
1 cup sake
olive oil

Directions:

1. Soak two cedar planks in water for 2 hours.

2. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine salt, brown sugar, 1/2 cup chopped dill and lemon zest.  Place salmon fillets in shallow  baking dish.  Coat with rub and refrigerate for 1.5 hours.

3. Rinse salmon and pat dry.  Return fillets to shallow baking dish and cover with sake.  Refrigerate for one hour, flipping salmon fillets after 30 minutes.

4. Light grill and cover for 10 minutes.  Grill cedar planks until grill marks appear, about 30 seconds on each side.

5. Drain salmon and pat dry.  Brush with olive oil and place two fillets on each cedar plank.  Top each fillet with dill sprig and two lemon slices, and drizzle lightly with more olive oil.

6. Turn off half of the burners on the grill and set planks over indirect heat.  You may need to cook them in two separate batches, depending on the size of your grill.  Cover and grill the salmon for 25-30 minutes, rotating the planks halfway through.  Tent with foil until ready to serve.

%d bloggers like this: