pad thai

All posts tagged pad thai

No Noodle Pad Thai

Published September 26, 2016 by jenmatteson

 

I had the most perfect bachelorette party. Okay, maybe I’m a bit biased, but it was perfect for me! A handful of my best friends went to one of the girls’ family cabin in seek of some lady fun in the sun. Well, it was 50 degrees and rainy all weekend in the end of July. So, you can imagine we had no fun staying inside. Psych! We had a freakin’ blast! There were games, gifts, girl talk, drinks, dancing, a red flannel serial killer, late nights, drinks, lots of drinks, did I mention drinks? Oh, and best of all, fooooooood! Good food! And, food I didn’t have to cook. Somehow that always tastes better ūüôā

20160801_183314

Why am I telling you a 3 year old story of a bunch of drunken girls that can dance and sing super well¬†ūüėȬ†?¬†Because my friend,¬†that was my introduction to a version of this “Pad Thai”. One of the girls, Kim, made this amazing zucchini noodle Pad Thai that was out of this world! I couldn’t believe that I wasn’t missing the actual noodles, and beside that, the dressing was bomb. She¬†used almond butter, which I prefer in this recipe. Sadly, I don’t keep it on hand at all times, so peanut butter is an adequate sub.

20160817_153709

With the crap-ton of zucchinis I had from my garden¬†this summer (check out the huge one at the top of the picture above!), I just had to make this, and what better time than a wine night with two of the five that were at the bachelorette party. I generally squeeze the excess water from the zucchini because I don’t like how well they stick together afterwards. This time, I didn’t thinking I was using them right away, so the moisture may not water it down too much. It did, so I would certainly suggest using a cheese cloth to get the excess water out. The noodles will be a bit stuck together after, but once you dress them, they’ll loosen up just fine. The dressing brings such a rich, indulgent taste to the dish, but you don’t have to feel guilty because you are getting more than your share of vegetables, and who doesn’t love that!

20160801_183331

No Noodle Pad Thai

Source: Adapted from Cookie and Kate
Servings: 4-6

Ingredients:

1/4 daikon radish, peeled
2 medium carrots, peeled
3 medium zucchini
handful bean sprouts
4 green onions
1 handful cilantro, chopped
1 tbsp. sesame seeds
1 lime, cut in wedges for serving

Peanut Sauce:
1/2 cup almond or peanut butter
1/4 cup lime juice
2 tbsp. tamari or soy sauce
2 tbsp. honey
2 tsp grated fresh ginger
1 pinch red pepper flakes
3 tbsp. water

Directions:

  1. Using a sprializer, mandolin or vegetable peeler, create “noodles” out of the radish, carrots and zucchini (you may want to squeeze the water out of the zucchini using a cheese cloth or other thin kitchen towel, clean – of course). Place in bowl and add bean sprouts,¬†onions, cilantro and sesame seeds. Toss to combine¬†and set aside.
  2. In a small bowl, combine peanut butter, lime juice, tamari or soy sauce, honey, ginger and red pepper flakes. Slowly whisk in warm water to achieve desired consistency (you may not need 3 tbsp., you may need more. Make it how you like it!).
  3. Drizzle dressing over vegetable noodles and toss to combine. Serve with a wedge of lime and garnish with sesame seeds and cilantro.
Advertisements

Shrimp Pad Thai

Published April 8, 2013 by jenmatteson

I’ve had quite the Asian theme going in the last few posts, and we couldn’t be happier campers. ¬†Well, maybe Nate would be if he didn’t have to split the leftovers with me!

Shrimp Pad Thai

Pad Thai was on my 30 Before 30 list, and as the months are quickly dwindling away, I am finally getting to it. ¬†I really should have tried it much sooner because it was amazballs. ¬†Part of the reason it has taken me so long to try this recipe is because one of the star ingredients, tamarind, isn’t available at my local grocery store. ¬†I actually had to step outside my comfort zone and stop into my local Asian market. ¬†Not sure why I was hesitant or what I was really expecting, but the gentleman who was working was quite friendly and more than helpful. ¬†This market carried paste, powder, and the solid block.¬† Some upscale grocery stores may carry tamarind, usually in paste form and in the Asian isle. ¬†But, the recipe I followed strongly suggests using the solid form that comes in a block.

TamarindDSC02251

Clearly, I’ve never worked with tamarind before, but I’m sure I’ve had it in a handful of Asian dishes I’ve ordered, not even knowing what the flavor really was. ¬†Tamarind is a pod-like fruit that tastes quite sweet and slightly tart. ¬†In my opinion, the sweetness and consistency is similar to figs. ¬†Seeing as though I only needed 3 tbsp for the Pad Thai, I had most of the block left. ¬†After some research, it appears the tamarind block can be stored in airtight container on the shelf. ¬†No refrigeration necessary. ¬†Most people says it lasts “forever”, though I’m guessing you’ll use it all before forever comes after you’ve tried this Pad Thai.

Shrimp Pad Thai

This recipe comes from Nicole over at Prevention RD. ¬†It was another home run! ¬†I can always count on her food to be yummy. ¬†There are a lot of components, and it’s slightly cumbersome to prepare, but as Nicole suggests, if you have everything measured out and ready to go, it comes together really quickly. ¬†This dish really hit the spot! ¬†After a long night with friends (and a few drinks), we were really ready for some flavorful comfort food. ¬†It’s amazing how much flavor the peanuts add, so do NOT forget them! ¬†For you vegetarians, the shrimp can easily be omitted or substituted with tofu, and omit the fish sauce or use this recipe for a substitute.¬† I only made a few adaptations to Nicole’s recipe, which was using 1 tsp cayenne rather than 3/4 tsp (of course we like it spicy), and using fresh rice noodles rather than the dried variety.¬† Whether you think you like Thai food or not, I highly suggest trying this out.¬† Nate and I really enjoyed it; he even had two hearty helpings!

Shrimp Pad Thai

Shrimp Pad Thai

Source: Adapted from Prevention RD
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

3 tbsp tamarind solid
3/4 cup water, boiling
3 tbsp fish sauce
1 tbsp seasoned rice vinegar
3 tbsp sugar
1 tsp cayenne pepper
4 tbsp peanut oil
8 oz rice stick noodles (my grocery store had fresh, but dried will work just fine)
2 large eggs
1/4 tsp salt
1 lb shrimp, peeled and deveined
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 medium shallot, minced
6 tbsp unsalted peanuts
3 cups bean sprouts
1/2 cup scallions, sliced thin
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
1 lime, cut into wedges

Directions:

1. Soak tamarind in 3/4 cup boiling water for 10 minutes.  Push tamarind through mesh strainer, reserving water in medium bowl.  To the bowl, add fish sauce, rice vinegar, sugar, cayenne and 2 tbsp peanut oil.  Stir and set aside.

2. If using dried rice stick noodles, cover with hot tap water in large bowl; soak until softened, pliable, and limp but not fully tender, about 20 minutes.  Drain noodles and set aside.  If using fresh rice stick noodles, in a medium sauce pan, fill with water and bring to a boil.

3. In a small bowl, beat eggs and 1/8 tsp salt.  Set aside.

4. Heat 1 tbsp oil in large skillet or wok over high heat until just beginning to smoke.¬† Add shrimp and sprinkle with remaining salt.¬† Cook and flip occasionally, until shrimp are opaque and beginning to brown around edges, about 3 minutes (don’t worry, they don’t have to be cooked completely through at this point).¬† Transfer to plate and set aside.

5. Discard any excess liquid in pan.  Add remaining tbsp oil to skillet and swirl to coat; heat to medium.  Add garlic and shallot and cook until golden brown, about 1 1/2 minutes.  Add eggs to skillet and stir with wooden spoon until lightly scrambled, less than 1 minute.  Meanwhile, drop rice stick noodles into boiling water, immediately remove and transfer to skillet.  Pour fish sauce mixture over noodles, increase heat to high, and toss constantly to coat noodles evenly.  Scatter 1/4 cup peanuts, bean sprouts, scallions (reserving some for garnish) and cooked shrimp over noodles.  Continue to cook on high, tossing until noodles are tender, about 3 minutes.

6. Transfer noodles to serving platter, sprinkle with remaining peanuts, scallions and cilantro.  Serve immediately with lime wedge.

%d bloggers like this: