salmon

All posts tagged salmon

Hoisin Glazed Salmon Burgers

Published June 19, 2013 by jenmatteson

I used to not like fish.  I know, I can’t believe it either.  But, now if I could afford to, I would eat fish every day.  When I was young, I would dabble in a little fried fish every now and then, only because it was fresh and my dad caught it, and it was what’s for dinner.  Finally, I grew out of my picky stage and realized how delicious fish is, especially my dad’s cracker crusted pan-fried walleye.  But, we’re not here to talk about walleye, we’re talking about salmon.

Hoisin Glazed Salmon Burgers

One of my first times trying salmon was at a place in downtown Minneapolis near my work.  It was a fairly fancy seafood place, and I wanted to try to expand my horizons, so I ordered a salmon burger.  It was so delicious.  Granted, I did top it with tartar sauce, not knowing at the time it was weird – but it is.  To this day, if I’m there for lunch, I’m likely to get the salmon burger.  Too bad I don’t work in Minneapolis anymore.

Hoisin Glazed Salmon Burgers

So when I saw Nicole’s recipe for salmon burgers, it took me back to my nearly virgin fish days.  The flavors aren’t really similar, but I still wanted to try it because I love salmon, and I really like Asian flare, so the hoisin glazed salmon burgers sounded right up my alley.  These came together so super quickly, and even better, tasted amazing.  The pickled cucumbers on top really add a bang to the burger.  It might also have to do with me adding a little extra cayenne pepper to the pickling juices.  The burgers were firm enough that I might have been able to grill them, but I didn’t want to take the chance of them falling apart, so I used a cast iron skillet.  The sesame oil added the perfect amount of nuttiness and wasn’t too overpowering.  This is a great summer burger recipe and alternative to your average turkey or beef burger.

Hoisin Glazed Salmon Burger

Hoisin Glazed Salmon Burgers

Source: Adapted from Prevention RD
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

For the cucumbers:
1/3 cup water
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 tsp fresh grated ginger
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1/2 cucumber, sliced thin (about 16 slices)

For the burgers:
1/2 cup panko
4 tbsp chives, minced
2 tbsp cilantro, chopped
1 tsp low-sodium soy sauce
1 1/2 tsp fresh grated ginger
1 tsp lime zest
1-1 lb skinless wild, fresh salmon fillet, finely chopped
1 large egg white
1 1/2 tsp sesame oil
2 tbsp hoisin sauce
4 hamburger buns

Directions:

1. In a small saucepan, combine water, vinegar, garlic, ginger and cayenne.  Bring mixture to a boil.  Remove from heat and add cucumbers.  Let stand for 30 minutes.

2. In a large mixing bowl, gently toss together panko, chives, cilantro, soy sauce, ginger, lime zest, salmon and egg white.  Separate mixture into four equal parts and shape into patties.

3. In a cast iron pan, heat sesame oil over medium-high heat.  Add two patties to the pan and cook for 3-4 minutes, until beginning to brown on the bottom, and flip.  Cook for another 3 minutes, brush the tops with hoisin sauce and cook for 30 seconds more.

4. Place patties on bun and top with cucumbers and top half of bun.

Cedar-Planked Salmon with Dill and Lemon

Published July 5, 2012 by jenmatteson

Nate and I both love fish, but we rarely eat it at home.  I’m such a compulsive frugal shopper, that sometimes it pains me to buy fish because it can be expensive compared to chicken or turkey.  But, sometimes it’s okay to splurge.  Today I splurged on salmon fillets, which I’ve been wanting to grill on our cedar planks for some time.

I thought I’d try something classic like dill and lemon so the flavor of the cedar could still shine through.  Since I’ve never made this before, I googled the ingredients, and the first result that came up was my favorite place to search for classic recipes, Food and Wine.  Perfect.  It had everything I wanted in addition to a salt cure, followed by a sake marinade.  The only down side of this recipe is how long you have to wait to eat it.  The salmon should sit in the cure for 1.5 hours, and then in the sake for another hour.  Add on another 25 minutes for cooking, plus 5 for resting…it’s far far too long.  This is certainly a great recipe for a weekend (or a day off work) so you can get it started early.  I didn’t get the cure going until about 6, and since we had to run some errands, I got the sake in there at about 8:30.  Then I waited the next hour in agony, praying for time to go by faster so we could eat.

But it was more than worth the wait!  The salmon literally melted in my mouth.  It was so silky smooth and bursting with fresh flavors of the dill and lemon.  I really wished I would have tried this while entertaining, but I suppose that gives me a good reason to make it again.  Who wants to come over for dinner??

Cedar-Planked Salmon with Dill and Lemon

Source: Food and Wine
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1/2 cup kosher salt
1/8 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup dill, chopped, plus 4 sprigs
zest of one lemon, plus 8 slices
4-8 oz salmon fillets, with skin
1 cup sake
olive oil

Directions:

1. Soak two cedar planks in water for 2 hours.

2. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine salt, brown sugar, 1/2 cup chopped dill and lemon zest.  Place salmon fillets in shallow  baking dish.  Coat with rub and refrigerate for 1.5 hours.

3. Rinse salmon and pat dry.  Return fillets to shallow baking dish and cover with sake.  Refrigerate for one hour, flipping salmon fillets after 30 minutes.

4. Light grill and cover for 10 minutes.  Grill cedar planks until grill marks appear, about 30 seconds on each side.

5. Drain salmon and pat dry.  Brush with olive oil and place two fillets on each cedar plank.  Top each fillet with dill sprig and two lemon slices, and drizzle lightly with more olive oil.

6. Turn off half of the burners on the grill and set planks over indirect heat.  You may need to cook them in two separate batches, depending on the size of your grill.  Cover and grill the salmon for 25-30 minutes, rotating the planks halfway through.  Tent with foil until ready to serve.

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