white beans

All posts tagged white beans

White Bean and Roasted Mushroom Soup

Published January 31, 2015 by jenmatteson

I remember Campbell’s Bean with Bacon soup making several appearances at my childhood table. I didn’t like it for the longest time. In fact, I didn’t like beans period. Especially baked beans. Clearly, I was a troubled child. I finally overcame my distain for these particular legumes, and embarrassingly enjoyed this sodium packed soup with my family often.

Before roasting mushrooms and onions

Flash forward a particular number of years, and here we are. I saw this recipe in my latest wine shipment insert from Viansa, and thought it was the perfect time of year to make soup. It didn’t once cross my mind that this soup would bring me back to my childhood frienemy, Campbell’s. But oddly enough, it did. Much better, and far more classy, however! 😉

White Bean and Roasted Mushroom Soup

The soup didn’t turn out quite a thick as the photo in the insert appeared, but that could easily be fixed by pureeing more beans. I didn’t, and I still loved it. While the soup reminded me of bean with bacon soup, the smell made me think of a mushroom pizza. Probably because of the roasted mushrooms, thyme and sage (great observation, Captain Obvious!). The roasted mushrooms alone were amazing, I could have probably just eaten the entire pan full, but because I didn’t have any more, I restrained myself and put them in the soup.

White Bean and Roasted Mushroom Soup

Adding the crispy pancetta is an absolute necessity. If you don’t have it, or don’t want to spend the dough for it, bacon would be a fine substitute. The crunchiness of the pancetta give the soup a balanced texture, while the salt really deepens the flavors. Serve with a  salad or a nice hunk of bread (rosemary focaccia pictured above) and you have a wonderful, light but filling winter meal.

White Bean and Roasted Mushroom Soup

Source: Adapted from Viansa
Servings: About 8

Ingredients:

1-2 tbsp. olive oil
6 oz. pancetta
16 oz. mushrooms, halved or quartered (so they are similar in size)
2 large sweet onions, quartered
3 garlic cloves, slightly crushed
1 1/2 tsp salt, divided
1 1/2 tsp pepper, divided
8-10 fresh sage leaves
8-10 stems + 1 tbsp. fresh thyme, divided
48 oz. chicken broth
3-15 oz cans white beans, drained

Directions:

1. Drizzle olive oil in small saucepan over medium heat. Add pancetta and cook until crispy and golden, about 8-10 minutes. Remove with slotted spoon and place on a paper towel-lined plate.

2. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Toss mushrooms, onions and garlic with olive oil, salt and pepper. Spread on prepared baking sheet. Add sage leaves and stems of thyme. Roast for 10 minutes, toss, and roast for additional 15 minutes.

3. While vegetables are roasting, add broth, beans, 1/2 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp pepper and 1 tbsp. fresh thyme leaves to a large stock pot. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. When vegetables are done roasting, separate mushrooms from onions and garlic. Retrieve 2 cups of the white beans and 1 cup of the broth from the stock pot. Add to food processor or blender along with roasted onions and garlic. Blend until smooth.

4. Add pureed bean mixture back to stock pot, bring to a boil and whisk until smooth. Reduce heat to simmer. Add roasted mushrooms to soup. Salt and pepper to taste and top with pancetta.

Meatless Monday: Keep warm with this White Bean-and-Leek Soup

Published February 10, 2014 by jenmatteson

I accidentally bought a few leeks at the supermarket the other day.  Not like they jumped in my basket, onto the conveyor belt and into my bag unnoticed.  I was picking up ingredients for a new scallop recipe, and thought it called for leeks, when truly, it was fennel.  Oops!  So, seeing as though I had these perfectly good leeks in my fridge, begging to be used, I decided to help them meet their destiny with a soup.

Whit Bean-and-Leek Soup

While I was making this soup, I was thinking, this is very simple.  As in, there isn’t much to it, I sure hope it tastes good.  But don’t worry, it does.  The practically melted leeks with a hint of thyme have a perfect savory-sweet pairing.  The beans give it a needed heft, and the croutons add a nice crisp.

Whit Bean-and-Leek Soup

The recipe calls for fresh grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, but I made mine without (except for garnishing in the picture).  I also used pretzel bread to make the croutons, which tasted absolutely amazing.  This soup comes together in less than 30 minutes, so it’s an easy weeknight meal, and is perfect warming agent during this polar vortex hulla-ballew.

White Bean-and-Leek Soup

White Bean-and-Leek Soup

Source: Adapted from Food and Wine
Servings: 4

Ingredients:

2 1-inch thick slices rustic bread, cut into 1-inch dice
1 tbsp. olive oil
kosher salt
freshly ground pepper
2 tbsp. unsalted butter
2 leeks, white and light green parts, cut in half lengthwise and thinly sliced
2 sprigs thyme
1 8.5-oz can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
4 cups low-sodium chicken broth (vegetable broth would be fine if you want to keep it vegan)
1/4 cup fresh grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (optional)

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  On a foil lined baking sheet, toss bread crumbs with olive oil and season with salt and pepper.  Bake until bread crumbs become golden brown and crisp.

2. In a large saucepan, melt butter.  Add leeks and thyme and cook over moderate heat, stirring frequently, until leeks are tender, about 10 minutes.  Add beans and chicken broth, cover and simmer until leeks are very tender, about 10 minutes more.  Season to taste.  Remove from heat, stir in Parmigiano-Reggiano if desired.  Serve and top with croutons.

Four Bean Turkey Chili

Published October 14, 2012 by jenmatteson

It is the perfect time of year for chili, and I had the perfect opportunity to make it this past weekend.  We had just gotten back from visiting my best friend in Duluth, and our neighbors were coming over to watch the Vikings game (the 3-1 Vikings at the time!).  Everyone has their own recipe for chili, and many are probably like mine; it changes a little each time, but generally the ingredients stay the same.  Growing up (and still), my dad always made a big pot of chili that would last my family for an entire week.  This is where I first learned to make it myself.  I pretty much stick to his recipe, with a few small changes.

I like to make turkey chili, but this would be just as good with ground beef, chicken – whatever YOU like to make your chili with.  Additionally, use whatever types of beans you like.  I use black, dark kidney, white kidney, and chili beans.  For some reason, the liquid in the beans kinda grosses me out, which is why I choose to drain my beans, except for the chili beans, because that liquid is seasoned and delicious and doesn’t look like some weird clear gelatinous goo 😛

The awesome thing about chili is that it is so versatile.  Not just with what ingredients you put in it, but how you eat it.  Of course there’s the traditional way of in a bowl with some choice toppings, but you can also make chili fries, chili dogs/brats, chili burgers, baked potatoes topped with chili, nachos, chili tacos or taco salad, and so on and so forth.  The possibilities are endless, so make a huge pot of chili and don’t be afraid to try it in a new vessel!  If all else fails, chili freezes super well, so you can either put a large amount in gallon sized zip-top freezer bag, or individual servings in quart sized zip-top freezer baggies.

Four Bean Turkey Chili

Source: Pigzilla Original, adapted from Mr. Pigzilla (my dad)
Servings: A LOT, probably 12-15

Ingredients:

olive oil
2 lbs lean ground turkey
4-5 cloves garlic, minced
3 bell peppers, diced (I use one yellow, red, and green)
4 jalapeno peppers, diced (and seeded for less heat)
1 large onion, diced
1 can low-sodium black beans, mostly drained
1 can low-sodium dark kidney beans, mostly drained
1 can low-sodium white kidney beans, mostly drained
1 can low-sodium chili beans
1 28 oz can plum tomatoes
1 12 oz beer (I use whatever I have on hand, this time I home-brewed Oktoberfest)
1 tbsp cumin
2 tbsp chili powder
1/2 tsp cinnamon
salt and pepper to taste
1 bunch cilantro

Directions:

1. In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat and brown meat.  Add garlic for last 2 minutes of browning.  Drain and transfer meat to large stock pot or slow cooker.

2. Using the same pan, add olive oil and saute peppers and onions over medium heat until slightly soft, about 3-5 minutes.  You may have to work in batches depending on how large the skillet is.  Transfer to stock pot or slow cooker with turkey.

3.  Add all beans to stock pot or slow cooker with turkey and vegetables.  Add tomatoes with all juices.  Using a wooden spoon, break up whole tomatoes into smaller pieces.  Add beer, cumin, chili powder and cinnamon.  Salt and pepper to taste.  If using stock pot over stove top, simmer mixture for at least one hour to let flavors develop and alcohol cook out of the beer.  If using a slow cooker, cook on high for at least one hour, or low for 2-4 hours.

4. Stir in cilantro just before serving.  Garnish with desired toppings (raw white or green onions, jalapenos, tomatoes, cheese, hot sauce, cilantro, tortilla chips, cheddar jalapeno beer bread,  Greek yogurt/sour cream, corn bread…).

One-Pot Rosemary Chicken and White Beans

Published June 14, 2012 by jenmatteson

There is nothing better for clean up than a one-pot meal.  Luckily for Nate, he’s the clean-up guy, so he had little to do after dinner tonight…except of course the dishes from my english muffin bread and whole wheat flour tortillas…I guess he just had little dinner dishes to do.

We had severe storms all day.  It was pitched black when I got to my office this morning, downpoured while I was leaving for an event, along with other severe storm warnings in the area, lightened up for a few hours, and then got severe again by the time I was headed home.  If I wasn’t working, it would have been a great day to stay home and cook all day long.  Which led me to what I consider a stew, thinking it would be great for such a gloomy and cool June Minnesota day.

Besides the flavor from the fat, I wasn’t quite sure the reasoning for searing the chicken with the skin on and then removing the skin, but I followed instructions as given.  Not sure it really added that much, but it was still delicious!  Nate and I agreed that the presentation of the chicken on the bone looks amazing, but for functionality, it might be best to take the chicken off the bone next time, as this recipe really eats like a stew.

 

One-Pot Rosemary Chicken and White Beans

Source: Adapted from Adventures in My Kitchen
Servings: 4-6

Ingredients:

2 chicken thighs, skin removed
2 chicken drumsticks, skin removed
2 sprigs fresh rosemary, chopped
salt and pepper
olive oil
1 fennel bulb, diced
1 medium onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 dry white wine
28 oz can whole peeled plum tomatoes
15 oz can cannellini or great northern beans, drained and rinsed
3 cups fresh spinach

Directions:

1. Heat olive oil in dutch oven over medium-high heat.  Season chicken with rosemary, salt and pepper.   Sear chicken in oil for 3-4 minutes on each side, until browned.  remove chicken from dutch oven.

2.  Add fennel and onions to dutch oven and cook over medium heat for 5-7 minutes, until vegetables begin to soften.  Add garlic and saute for 2 minutes, or until fragrant.  Add chicken back to pot and white wine.  Scrape bottom with wooden spoon to get browned bits up and simmer.  Add tomatoes and their juices and beans.  Crush tomatoes with wooden spoon.  Simmer for 20-25 minutes.

3. Add spinach and stir.  Let simmer for 5 minutes.  Serve in bowls or deep plates with crusty bread.

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